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Façade of Pharos building

Façade of Pharos building
Client: Rijksgebouwendienst / Kohn Pederson Fox Architects (London)
Year: 2002 (never realised)
Published in:
– Log magazine, The Wipers by Hilary Sample, 2011
– Towers, maintenance, and the desire for effortless permanence by Hilary Sample,
Princeton Architectural Press, 2010
– Frame magazine, the international magazine of interior architecture and design, 2004

Installation to embellish the five-storey section of Pharos, an office building designed by Kohn Pederson Fox in Hoofddorp, The Netherlands. Being a prominent landmark next to the railway station and Schiphol Airport, the work had to be a ‘welcoming gesture,’ which had to be integrated into the predominantly glazed façade. This ‘gesture’ exists of 85 windscreen wipers, such as those used for aeroplanes and lighthouses. Taking more than Holland’s notoriously rainy weather into consideration, I also developed a program that enables wipers to wave individually, per floor or in sync; the whole façade beckoning as one big welcome of oscillating ‘arms’.

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Veenhuizen

Client: Rijksgebouwendienst
2004-2005 (never realized)

The formal prison in Veenhuizen (nowadays main administration office prisons) is built as a square, one side left ‘open’ with a glass facade.
I was asked to make a design for the whole glass facade, whereby the courtyard had to be visible. Behind the glass facade five rails are placed close to each other, each rail conducting one big plate of glass. Every plate has it’s own graphic pattern that refers to the history of the building (prison bars); transparent coloured horizontal, vertical and diagonal stripes.
Mechanical driven they move very slowly behind each other whereby endlessly new patterns and new colour combinations develop (when blue horizontal stripes are crossing yellow vertical stripes, you’ll get green squares, etc.). Every hour the facade would look different.